I’m going to move web hosts

lorryMy current web host (BlueHost) is not very good. This year I have had severe outages and the helpdesk is not helpful, and they aren’t cheap.

I have identified a better hosting arrangement: move WordPress to WordPress.com and HTML to a very reliable web host. The cost will be less when it’s all done… and it will work better.

Unfortunately bits of the site will go missing for a few days during the move but it will all be back afterwards. Then, I’ll migrate the best pages of the HTML (the old bemuso.com web site) into WordPress a page at a time, and update them as I go. When it’s all in WordPress it will be far easier to update and it will look much cooler.

About half the old site has lost its relevance over the years so I’ll just retire those bits.

There is a bit of groundwork to do first so nothing will happen for a few weeks. I’ll post again right before the fun and games begin.

UPDATE: Research has shown moving WordPress to WordPress.com is not easy. There are tools but the media library (basically all the pictures) and links to it must be rebuilt manually. So I’m adjusting my move to leave out WordPress.com for now.

More Rob Chapman

In case you weren’t convinced by my previous Rob Chapman video here’s another.

This was way back in 2008 long before  other things happened but he tells you how he got underway. Since then of course he has gone further than he might have expected in 2008.

What is perhaps notable about his advice is the lack of music biz jargon. SXSW is on again, and that’s a useful yardstick with its many pundits and acres of Powerpoint. He has none of that.

It is now well over a decade since I started writing about the music business online. And one of my key findings in that time is the irrelevance of media froth. It’s worse than irrelevant, it’s a distraction. Rob Chapman cheerfully ignores it.

Things have been quiet here for a year or so. There are many things I could do but I have spent a lot of time thinking rather than uploading. At the heart of this is froth overload and time wasted keeping “up-to-date” with irrelevance. There are things I must do to clean up the site and correct old info, so updates will occur. I also have new material but the hours, days and weeks I have recovered from froth have gone into real world activity so far. So apologies for the lack of stuff recently but that is why.

Blockbusters

Blockbusters cover picA friend of mine drew my attention to this book (BLOCKBUSTERS Hit-making, Risk-taking, and the Big Business of Entertainment). My reading list is already way too long so I won’t get round to it for some time but the research is interesting.

The question it addresses is: should the entertainment industry bet bigger or smaller? The answer, with a lot of detailed examples, seems to be that blockbusters make bigger returns even taking into account big bets that fail.

To some extent this validates the longstanding (and to me baffling) record industry practice of signing 100 artists when only one will be successful.

(The rule of thumb always was that only one in ten signings release anything and one in ten of the releases make money. So, one in a hundred overall. In practice, post-2000, fewer artists get signed and fewer releases break even but the general principle remains.)

This also answers the question, if things carry on the same way, will the Internet fundamentally change how the music business mainstream works? Maybe not, after all.

If you have read it let me know what you think.